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Emma Phillips & Barrister speak out

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Emma Phillips, owner of ‘Quite Easy” posted this in the UKSJ Forum. (more…)

Showjumper found slaughtered on owner’s Florida farm

We have learned of the horrific incident the took place in Florida, where the French bred gelding ‘Phedras de Blondel’ (Fetiche du Pas x Belphegor IV) was found slaughtered on his owners farm. Debbie Stephens and her husband Steve Stephens, recently bought the horse from France and he was brought into the States just days before. There is a reward offered for the capture of these ruthless ‘people’ who took the life of an innocent animal for horse meat. Please read the Stevens’ statement below and help with the investigations. The people responsible do not belong in our society.  (more…)

”FORGOTTEN HORSES ” CALENDARS ARE ON SALE NOW

FORGOTTEN HORSES CALENDARS ARE ON SALE NOW

ALL PROCEEDS FROM THE SALES OF THE CALENDAR GO DIRECTLY TO THE CARE OF THE CHARITY’S HORSES.
AT ONLY €5 + P&P they are a lovely addition to your home/tack room etc.
Payment can be made via the website on PayPal..

Forgotten Horses Ireland's photo.
Forgotten Horses Ireland's photo.

Cloning horses. For it or against it?

Cloning Horses. Are we for it or against it?

By Niamh D. O Gorman

Cloning horses is a regular occurrence in today’s society. Top competition horses are being cloned in the hopes of a definite future champion or to restore the breeding capacity of animals which did not produce as many offspring as they should, because of castration, sub fertility or premature death.. (more…)

Forgotten Horses Ireland – A non-profit organisation to improve the lives of Ireland’s forgotten horses

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The Forgotten horses of Ireland

by Niamh D’ O’ Gorman

Horses are synonymous with Ireland. The Connemara Pony, Irish Draft, famous Thoroughbreds and Sporthorses and of course, the iconic donkey. This being our heritage, It is shameful that reports of neglect and abuse of horses in Ireland has even reached the front page of ‘The New York Times’.

Unfortunately, the value of horses has seriously declined – many are virtually worthless in some peoples eyes. . For the Celtic Tiger syndicates, horses that have given their all on the racecourse and no longer serve a purpose for their owners are vulnerable. Some of these horses are put down. Others are retrained and re-homed while others are set loose to run wild and starve.

For some people, the economy has hit them very hard and many may be struggling to keep a roof over their heads and they simply cannot afford to look after a much loved horse or pony. So what happens to these horses and ponies? Where do these forgotten horses end up?

Recently, a very good friend of mine, Bronagh Watson told me about a wonderful charity in Galway, ‘Forgotten Horses Ireland’.  Forgotten Horses Ireland is an organisation that is committed to the care and welfare of feral and abandoned horses. The group was formed in March 2012 as a result of a large number of horses dying in a particular commonage area in the South East Galway area.

Forgotten Horses Ireland has an active fundraising calendar with the aims of both educating the public regarding equine welfare and raising funds for a rehabilitation center for horses, for the purposes of retraining and rehoming these unwanted animals.  The charity has an adoptive and foster home program for some horses and will require a home check. You will also have to prove you are financially stable to provide for the horse/pony’s  needs.

This Organisation is one every animal lover should get behind. Please support their fundraisers and help feed these starving horses that for varies reasons, society has forgotten. If you need any information, statistics or want to donate money, a bag of feed or a bale of hay, then please get in touch with the website or facebook page. This is a charity Equestrian News and Sports Media supports 100%. Please get behind this worthy cause.

http://forgottenhorses.com/

https://www.facebook.com/forgottenhorsesireland/timeline